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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 591 (some duplicates have been removed)
complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines came into in 2009 and subsequ
the demonstration. the protesters say the copper mine is damaging the environment. myanmar's decision to use force is likely to cause alarm among western nations who have praised its democratic reforms. and so why did the government pretsz ahead with the crackdown? well, nhk world's jun kobayashi reports from yangon. >> reporter: the crowd included local buddhist monks. the demonstrators demanded a halt to mining operations in central myanmar. local officials say at least 70 people were injured. the protests began in mid-november. local residents say they were forced from their homes. they say the mine is polluting the environment. president thein sein stressed the crackdown. he issued a statement saying the protest were broken up according to the law. the largest opposition leader aung san suu kyi went to the site on thursday night. she called on both sides to seek settlement. >> translator: i want to solve this problem peacefully and in a dignified manner. i want to request that all of you help me on this. >> reporter: the copper mine is being jointly developed by chinese company and the firm li
the copper mine is damaging the environment. myanmar's decision to use force is likely to cause alarm among western nations who have praised its democratic reforms. and so why did the government press ahead with the crackdown? well, nhk world's jun kobayashi reports from yangon. >> reporter: since thursday, they've disbursed hundreds of protesters. the crowd included local residents and buddhist monks. the demonstrators demanded a halt to mining operations in central myanmar. local officials say at least 70 people were injured. the protests began in mid-november. local residents say they were forced from their homes. they say the mine is polluting the environment. president thein sein has stressed the legitimacy of the crackdown. he issued a statement saying the protests were unauthorized and broken up according to the law. the largest opposition leader aung san suu kyi rushed to the site on thursday night. she called on both sides to seek a negotiated settlement. >> translator: i want to solve this problem peacefully and in a dignified manner. i want to request that all of you help me on t
-olent environment. narrator: in the subregion of latin america called "southern south america," the country of chile is also threated by volcanoes and earthquakes. but here, pacific rim dynamism is more about economics than plate tectonics. 2,500 miles long and averaging just 90 miles wide, this elongated state spans a diverse range of natural environments. each of those environments offers opportunities for primary econom activy. each of those environments based on those activities, chile has grown a dynamic export economy. that growth has brought numero changes tohile's hum geography, incling gend rol and settlent patterns. chile's capil,antiago, is the cenof tountry's service sector, the largest partf its economy. ers inoun amic santthe resultingeupe populn tof mostly spanish colonization over several centuries. but more recently, chile'sthe prary stant foreign connecto the osideorwith europe. are best seen here, in valparaíso, chile's largest port. foreign trade is a cornerstone of the new economy, and most of it is with pacific rim countries, including the united states. man: chile has become
've been a fish or a bird or a game species of some kind or a forest. when we think about the environment and our place and i come the species of concern became us. what we do to the environment and what we do to ourselves in the process. so i think when i looked back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the national world. michael rachel carson fault line come a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in conservation movement, which i'll talk about in a moment and was really an affect the founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to actually point to a specific moment in time when that happened, when we began to think differently about the environment and our relation to it. it came in the late summer of 1962 about a month before rachel "silent spring" is an unpublished. in june of 1962 come at the yorker published three long excerpts. through the course of the summary huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides on it and people beg
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
of the lake that has been sealed off for thousands of years? >> it is a very dark environment. there is no light from the surface. it is very cold. we think it is one of the most stable cold environment that also has a liquid water. the water in the lower lake ice is in this spiderweb network, connected in different layers from 16 meters all the way down to 27 meters. >> sounds amazing. what did you find? gregg's we drove our scores from the a lake surface. -- >> we drilled from the lake's surface. we found a syrupy brian. when we brought the brine to a surface we looked to see if there was any life. we found there was quite abundant cellular life. much to our surprise. and then we took the brine back to the lab to detect if there was metaphorically active. -- metabolic lee active. >> could it be supporting live down there, like fish, or loch ness monster? >> the only life forms we have found is a bacteria. >> what are the implications of what you found? >> this gives us a perspective that life can exist and be sustained for thousands of years without any influence from the su
leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the
environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to carry into this.
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> hello, my name is jamie harper. in this episode, we are featuring the park locations in your very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. golden gate park's largest body of water is this lake, a popular spot for
. so one of the things that many of us here understand that the environment or what we call the climate influences outcomes but often times in public schools where decisions are made, climate and educational mandates are perceived as two opposite ends of the continuum, like when i have time and i've achieved my test scores and we've got everything buttoned up, then we'll get to the klie mallet. we've heard it from speaker after speaker, that conditions set the stage for children to leeb lean in and achieve. the good news is we can move bullying out of the front page not with more dollars but with more changes in our attitudes and our interactions. if more teachers perceive themselves to be call friendly and know the names of boys and girls in their buildings, part of it is reeducation that climate and environment and changing social norms is not secondary, it's primary and when we all embrace that then we'll begin to see the changes in the policies and the practices and we'll begin to get the results we want. we need to advocate for improving the social climates of our public school
, paying his visit to capitol hill. why do we not see that any more? is it two sides or environment is so hardened? >> i think so. i also think that personality of these two men would not be best described as anti-social they to. but we're seeing this weird culture of bipartisan, you know we were supposed to put it away after the elect, and think about what is best of the country. i think they are staaing separate, they should be eating at the same table now. neil: they are not doing that. there is so much you could dodo with a serogate, and say surprise it seems to me, dr., doctor when ronald reagan heard things come up out of capitol hill, or tip o'neill he brought him over to the white house, said how can we compromise on this his famous line, i would rather get 80% of a loaf or no loaf at all, we don't see it, it is either my way or the highway, and i blame motorcycl both side. >> i do too, you said the word, compromise that is what works in great marriaging and even politics. meet in the middle. neil: why not have it at the white house? i think that white house, if you do something i
attack on the environment. under the current ordinances, the [speaker not understood] must decide whether the project may have a significant effect on the environment based on a fair argument standard. [speaker not understood] code 31.1. the proposed amendment eliminates all references to the fair argument standard and adopts a new substantial evidence legal standard for the city's c-e-q-a purposes. the fair argument standard is another standard than substantial evident. under california statute, the city must create an e-i-r when a project may have a significant effect upon the environment. the legal standard in question is an interpretation of may. accordingly, it is likely more projects would require an e-i-r under the fair standard -- fair argument standard and pier project would require an e-i-r under the substantial evidence standard. more over, california case law has consistently adopted the fair argument standard when interpreting whether the project may have a significant effect on the environment. thus it is unclear whether the city of san francisco has the authority to change
is that the qualitiv of our environment here in the bay area is key, is a very key factor to maintaining our economic health and vitality. we need strong economic -- sorry, environmental protections and regulations. we have come to the conclusion that c-e-q-a provides none of that. c-e-q-a is a law that is for all intents and purposes obsolete. some of the people who spoke before me mentioned that many, many federal and state statutes that have been passed since c-e-q-a was written into law in 1970, that duplicate what c-e-q-a does. all of c-e-q-a currently does is absent those additional protections is put in place a very lengthy process for review and a very low threshold for litigation. that low threshold for litigation invites bad players into the process. if you look at who sues projects and who tries to stop projects, three main constituencies, the environmental community is not one of them. the labor community sues projects for project labor agreements, to try and leverage those agreements from project sponsors. not so long ago i was downstairs at the hearing for the cathedral hill hospital wh
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
and the department of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with t
down the exterior of the building. so imaging that this will be a very calm environment when it comes to controlling wind. and it also allows us to address the whole issue of how to avoid birds flying into the structure. that extra depth and and keeping the birds from hitting the building. if you look across first street you see one of the key retail lobbies of the center at the street level. and you see the entrance to parking and you see the relationship between the north edge of the transit center and the south edge of the tower. now, you are standing across mission street. at the corner of mission and freemont. once again you see the heavier metallic work at the base of the tower and you see the grove of redwoods and the sculpture at the corner and you see how lively and prominent that is going to be and i think that it is welcoming public presence in the streets of san francisco. and you are now looking directly across mission street, the tower is on your right and the grove of redwoods are inviting you to enter the center and immediately on access in front of you are the two mai
and reminding me "you don't cut the trees down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on t
out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful
an incredibly difficult political environment and a really challenging fiscal environment as well and that's put a ton of pressure on adhering to the pledge. >> stephen: isn't grover norquist going to bring down the hammer on these guys come midterms? >> it's very hard to say because in some places-- for example south carolina and georgia-- that's very possible. but you have to understand --. >> stephen: real america. >> exactly. but, you have to understand -- hey, i'm from brooklyn, my friend. that's real america, too. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: no, excuse me, calm down, that's "real" america. it's ironic patriotism. >> america has changed a n a lot of ways over 20 years. one of the big changes is that we have a lot more people over the age of 65. and republicans, like democrats, like programs like medicare and social security so when you have a lot more old people, those programs get more expensive and that means that it's hard to keep tax levels exactly where they have been during the bush years. >> stephen: that's fine. but why is this happening publicly. why are people like lindsey g
in a bill rate environment for the self amortization was happening very quickly because interest rates are low and on the other hand, we are in a place and time of property values were declining. this is a policy that might've made sense in 2000, but it doesn't make sense today. and having an office that can really dig into these kinds of information and make policy changes they somewhat were finding. so i'm not going to go into every action that were taking, but i hope what people see from this is we are continuing to be aggressive about taking action and ensuring we can put the phone in the best position possible while balancing the need to provide access to credit for would-be home buyers and healthy neighborhoods in the nation frankly keep this fragile housing recovery going. it's attending medical very much. [applause] >> thank you so much. that was a remarkably clear and informative presentation in a short time. we appreciate that. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our impressive panel. we'll go in order. roberto quercia misdirect her of the usc center for community capital w
. long paths allow you to meander, perfect for dog walking in a wooded environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for foo
in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for instance i have a case of like costco
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
's a healthy environment and bullying prevents that for so many kids. when terreesa and i addressed issues around truancies and one of the common themes and i saw this before with sexually exploited cases and kids were afraid to go to school because of the terrorism going on and with bullying it's flat out terrorism for the victim and the recipient of it. our efforts are strong because we don't want kids to feel that the only choice is don't go to school or find a new school to go to and also gave us the opportunity to look at the children that are bullied and what is going on in their house or family and why are they acting out to an aggressive, mean way? and it opened up a lot of doors for us and our initiative is take this head on to make sure children feel safe and they are safe and our challenge is the introduction of the internet and social media and can be so insidious behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we fran
probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists wh
response at the local level, and then herding all the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no
. the most extreme environments. it's not the best place to look for life. in fact, there is water. in fact, the water is located in deep craters, near the north pole. mercury kind of orbits with very little tilt. near the north pole with the deep craters, it never gets subject. that's why it's so cold. but much of the water is covered by a thin layer of organic material. >> all right. i think we're having a little trouble hearing lawrence there. we'll try and get him back because it is a really interesting discussion. we'll work on that. >>> his resume includes two academy awards, five golden globes, and an emmy. now dustin hoffman will be able to add a new honor to that impressive list. we'll tell you what it is. >>> first, if you're looking for a getaway, think springtime in paris. that's where we find our this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. if y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 591 (some duplicates have been removed)